Zaproszenie na wykład "Speakers’ attitudes toward language varieties within the context of L1 and L2"

Serdecznie zapraszamy na otwarte zebranie Zakładu Glottodydaktyki w dniu 22.05.2018 r. o g. 13.15 w sali 1.008, na którym dr Krisztina Feher wygłosi wykład na temat:

Speakers’ attitudes toward language varieties within the context of L1 and L2.

 

Dr. Krisztina Feher is an assistant lecturer at the Department of Hungarian Linguistics, University of Debrecen, Hungary. She received her PhD in linguistics in 2012. Since then she published three books and numerous journal articles. Her research interest is sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics with the focus on first language acquisition, including grammar, phonetics-phonology, as well as the evolution of linguistic preferences and attitudes toward language varieties. Since 2003 dr Feher has taught various courses mainly in the above fields. She has experience in teaching Hungarian as a Second Language, too. In 2014 she was a visiting scholar during a Spring semester at the Indiana University Bloomington, IN, USA. In the last two years she presented three papers and participated in a research seminar as a guest teacher at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland and at the IUB.

 

Abstract
After a brief overview of the projects of the Research Group for Socio-cognitive Linguistics in Debrecen, the talk will present the findings and future plans for an on-going research of an experimental investigation into Hungarian children’s language attitudes towards varieties of their native language. In the field of sociolinguistics there has been no doubt for a long time that speakers’ attitudes could have intensive effect on linguistic changes and language usage in speech communities, even if the speakers are not aware of them (e.g. Labov 1966). In the field of cognitive linguistics it has also been revealed that infants show preference to the language which they are exposed to in their families on a daily basis. The more they are familiar with a language the more attention they pay to it (Mehler et al. 1988, Byers-Heinlein et al. 2010 etc.). Due to this, balanced bilingual infants cannot prefer one of their native languages to the other (Byers-Heinlein et al. 2010). In studies of first language acquisition (L1) it has also been demonstrated that infants as early as 5-6 month old prefer their native language spoken by a native speaker to a foreign-accented variety of their native language (e.g. Kinzler et al. 2007). This kind of attitude seems to be present even in adults, though another aspect of speakers’ language attitudes appears to change in the opposite direction by adulthood. Findings of Matched-Guise Technique (MGT) tests show that in their evaluations monolingual adults have no longer followed the initial pattern, i.e. “the more familiar the better”. Instead, they judge the standard variety of their language as “smarter” (overt prestige), while they consider their vernacular varieties as “nicer” (covert prestige) (Preston 1999). In the meantime they keep showing negative reactions toward other non-standard dialects and foreign accents of their native language (Kontra ed. 2003. etc.). Bilingual adults could have similar attitudes toward their languages: one of them might have higher overt prestige than the other (e.g. Lambert et al. 1960). This kind of “evolution” of language attitudes can be important even from the point of view of second language acquisition (L2). We already know much about adults from sociolinguistic studies, and about infants from the experiments in cognitive psychology. But we still know little about the attitudes of speakers between infancy and adulthood, particularly regarding bilingual kindergarten children’s language attitudes. The talk will present a MGT-based research on this issue in order to open a discussion on ideas for a Polish–Hungarian cooperation between L1 and L2 experts.

 

Fot. Mirosław Kaźmierczak, Archiwum Biura Promocji UW

 

Fot. Mirosław Kaźmierczak, Archiwum Biura Promocji UW

 

Fot. Archiwum Biura Promocji UW

 

Fot. Archiwum Biura Promocji UW

 


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